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foot care

  1. Steps to Help Prevent Amputations

    By: Erick Janisse, CO, CPed, Corporate Trainer

    A recent article published in Podiatry Today notes that the frequency of foot amputations in patients with diabetes has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic.1  Pandemic or no, having to have a foot amputation is a fear for many of the 34 million Americans living with diabetes. Fortunately, the majority of diabetes-related foot complications are preventable – and fairly easily so.2

    Most amputations in folks with diabetes are preceded by a foot ulcer.3  A diabetic foot ulcer is a wound that can develop on the foot as an indirect result of the nerve damage that diabetes can cause called peripheral neuropathy.4  When someone has peripheral neuropathy, they may have diminished sensation in their feet and might not be able to feel things like foreign objects in their shoe or a shoe that is too tight and causing excessive pressure on the foot.  Things like foreign objects or shoes rubbing can cause skin breakdown (i.e. an ulcer).5  If the ulcer becomes infected, it could eventually require full or partial amputation of the foot.

    The steps to preventing a diabetic foot ulcer are, therefore, the steps to preventing amputations.  As mentioned above, they are pretty simple and straightforward.6,7

    1. Have your feet examined by a doctor regularly – at least twice a year.
    2. If you have neuropathy, it is important to have your shoes fit by a shoe-fitting professional.
    3. You should look for shoes that have plenty of space for your feet as well as any special inserts your doctor may prescribe for you. Generally speaking, we like to see about ½” of space between the end of your longest toe and the front of the shoe when you’re standing. It’s also important that the shoe is the proper width so that no part of your foot overlaps the shoe sole.
    4. Always keep your feet protected – especially if you’ve been diagnosed with neuropathy. This means always wearing well-fitting shoes whenever you’re up and walking…and never going barefoot.
    5. Check your feet daily for wounds, blisters or red spots and contact your doctor right away should you find anything amiss.
    6. If you have swelling in your feet, your doctor may prescribe compression socks to help control the swelling. Wearing the compression socks helps maintain your skin’s integrity and may improve shoe fit.
    7. Replace your shoes at least annually; or sooner if needed or recommended by your physician.

    The majority of amputations are preventable.  It isn’t difficult but does require some diligence in following a few simple guidelines.

     

    References:

    1. Spector, J. Studies note increase in amputations after arrival of COVID-19 pandemic. Podiatry Today. 2020 Oct;33(10):10-11.
    2. Bus SA, van Netten JJ. A shift in priority in diabetic foot care and research: 75% of foot ulcers are preventable. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2016 Jan;32 Suppl 1:195-200.
    3. Brocco E, Ninkovic S, Marin M, Whisstock C, Bruseghin M, Boschetti G, Viti R, Forlini W, Volpe A. Diabetic foot management: multidisciplinary approach for advanced lesion rescue. J Cardiovasc Surg (Torino). 2018 Oct;59(5):670-684.
    4. https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/preventing-problems/nerve-damage-diabetic-neuropathies (accessed 10/7/20)
    5. Reiber GE, Vileikyte L, Boyko EJ, del Aguila M, Smith DG, Lavery LA, Boulton AJ. Causal pathways for incident lower-extremity ulcers in patients with diabetes from two settings. Diabetes Care. 1999 Jan;22(1):157-62.
    6. Ang GY, Yap CW, Saxena N. Effectiveness of Diabetes Foot Screening in Primary Care in Preventing Lower Extremity Amputations. Ann Acad Med Singap. 2017 Nov;46(11):417-423.
    7. Iraj B, Khorvash F, Ebneshahidi A, Askari G. Prevention of diabetic foot ulcer. Int J Prev Med. 2013;4(3):373-376.

     

    The contents of this blog were independently prepared and are for informational purposes only. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily indicative of the views of any other party. Individual results may vary depending on a variety of patient-specific attributes and related factors.

  2. Don't Go Barefoot

    Don't go barefoot

    Even when you’re not out and about…wearing your shoes is important!We hope that this finds you all well in these constantly changing times.  Many of us are sticking close to home and not going out as much as we are accustomed to.  However, it’s important to remember that those of us with diabetes and/or at-risk feet should still wear our shoes and inserts whenever we’re up and walking around – inside the house and out. Continue reading

  3. 5 Ways to Take Care of Your Feet

    Ways to take care of your feet

    Feet carry all of our weight but are usually neglected. While easy to forget, it pays to take care of them.
    Continue reading

  4. 4 At-Home Tips to Help Manage Your Foot Health

    Home Foot Health Tips

    Did you know that your feet combined contain more than 50 bones, which accounts for about one-fourth of all the bones in your body, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA)? Also, your feet together have 60 joints and more than 200 muscles, tendons, and ligaments that hold them together and help them move. With so many bones, joints, muscles, tendons, and ligaments, your foot health is important to move daily.

    For such a small part of the human body, your feet play a dominant role. Just walking around with many pounds placed on them can put a lot of wear and tear on them. So, it’s a good idea to pay attention to your feet to help prevent pain or infection. Continue reading

  5. Fascinating Foot Facts

    Foot Facts

    At Dr. Comfort®, we’re experts in comfortable footwear that address a number of foot-related medical issues. We’re obviously big fans of feet. Whether you love them or hate them, feet are fascinating. While we usually focus on foot health, we wanted to dive into some interesting facts about feet.

    The human foot has been growing progressively larger over the years. In the 1960s for example, the average shoe size for a woman in the US was 6.5. Now the average size is between an 8.5 and 9!

    Continue reading

  6. Foot Care Tips for the Convention Goer

    Convention Foot Care

    Maybe you work in sales, or maybe you don’t, but either way, it’s likely that you’ve been to trade shows or conventions. According to the Convention Industry Council, 205 million people in the United States attend conventions, conferences, congresses, trade shows and exhibitions each year. Conventions are essential to gaining new knowledge in your field, networking with cross-country colleagues, and promoting your company and/or products, and, while all are beneficial, conventions can do a number on your body, particularly on your feet.

    Exhibit halls are very, very long with concrete floors providing little support. In fact, the largest convention center in North America, McCormick Place in Chicago, IL is 2,670,000 sqft! Chances are that if you’re on the floor, whether you’re an exhibitor or attendee, you’re on your feet. All day. This not only causes foot pain but soreness in your knees, hips, back, and shoulders, but makes those long hours seem even longer. To help you keep your convention experience pain-free, here are some helpful foot care tips for before, during and after your day on the trading floor.

    Continue reading

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